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NFS Client in Windows 7 Pro

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I realise this is a little late to the game, but I find Microsoft’s attitude towards end users offensive.  Take for example the statement “NFS Client isn’t something we usually support here” because the “Microsoft Answers website since Answers is directed towards consumers” is offensive.  Consumers are increasingly operating in heterogeneous environments thanks in no small part to Microsoft’s steadfast insistence on not actually listening to its customer base.  For better or worse, Mac desktops and notebooks are seeing a dramatic rise, especially within the North America.  Microsoft knows this.

This has a direct effect on the topic at hand in that consumer level devices are now increasingly being shipped not only supporting NFS, but with NFS as the default protocol.  NFS (and similar heterogeneous cohabitation technologies) quite simply are consumer-level technologies today.  Attempting to proclaim it otherwise because it doesn’t meet with the party line on the topic does nothing but further alienate the customer base.

Not that the arbitrary stratification of versioning that leaves those of us with “Windows 7 Professional” operating systems out in the cold hasn’t done that already.

That rant over and done with, let’s get around to actually helping people here!  Some NFS client information of relevance to real people, in the real world:

1) A Google Code project that brings NFS v2/3 support to Windows/ NFS 4.1 support is under active development, but not yet supported: nekodrive.  Quite frankly, this isn’t quite ready for prime time, unless you are willing to be a little nerdy about it.  It is okay for one-off work, but doesn’t operate nearly as seamlessly as a proper client.

2) The University of Michigan NFS v 4.1 client. This is the exact same client for NFS 4.1 that Microsoft included in Windows 8.  (Indeed, Microsoft funded its development.)  It is located here.  However, it does take a little bit of knowledge to install.  I have found it easily scriptable for installs on a mass scale, and certainly not a problem for installs on my home machine.

The project maintains a code regular code drop, and the binaries can be accessed here.  Alongside the install instructions above, any novice computing enthusiast who has actually typed “start, run, CMD” before will be perfectly able to get a top notch NFS 4.1 client up and running on Windows 7 Professional.

I can’t recommend the this 4.1 client enough.  If you have NAS devices supporting NFS 4 (for example, a Synology with the latest DSM), this client is great a bridging the gap between Windows and Mac.

3) There was a company called Labtam that once made a relevant product.  The website is still up, however all indications are that they ceased to exist towards he end of 2009.  It may be worth further investigation to see if they have sold the tech on to someone, as the internets claims it was reasonably reliable for NFS v3.  At $40, it’s significantly cheaper than an “anytime upgrade,” and has the additional bonus of neither condoning nor encouraging Microsoft’s arbitrary product segregation.

Will Windows 8 – presuming you can stomach Metro – be more of the same?  Or will the reduced edition count lead to an unprecedented breakout of sanity?  Somehow, I doubt it.

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