drink the sweet feeling of the colour zero

On not dropping the PR and marketing ball

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As a tech journalist and as a commercial tech writer the bane of my professional existence is PR and marketing people who don’t know anything about the companies or products they are trying to promote. The very worst among offenders among them are simply applying “tickbox” marketing and PR; they go through whatever list they were given in school and figure selling tech is the same as selling apples.

Fortunately, not all PR and marketing people are like this.

I don’t have time to praise everyone in tech PR and marketing that are great at their job. There are a lot of you out there, and I love each and every one of you for it. There is, however one comparative anecdote I’d really like to share that should drive home the difference between someone who’s terrible at their job and someone who is truly amazing at it.

Dropping the ball

On the terrible at their job side we have an individual working for a hybrid-cloud-in-a-can company that doesn’t know what their own product does. The solution in question is an OpenStack-based hyperconverged appliance starting at four nodes that has some built-in options to interconnect with OpenStack-based service providers and/or a major public cloud provider.

This isn’t exactly rocket surgery anymore. At the end of 2017, there are a dozen cloud-in-a-can providers, many of which shift OpenStack based solutions. By now, anyone who knows anything about private cloud technology can tell you pretty much all you need to know about this product just by saying “OpenStack-based hyperconverged cloud-in-a-can”.

I published a blog on a tech news website that mentioned the vendor in question’s solution. It was a passing comment as an example of a vendor in the space who has done reasonably well and had a few big customer wins.

A marketing person for this company wrote me to ask that I make some changes to the article. They didn’t want me to mention that they were using hyperconvergence to lash the nodes together. “They’re not hyperconverged” sayeth the marketdroid (yes they are, BTW), they’re “multi-cloud” (that’s a huge stretch).

If that wasn’t enough, the marketing body had a list of things in the article they wanted clarified. From common acronyms to terms of the trade to idioms. There was even a discussion about how “snapshotting” isn’t a verb. (Terrifyingly, this is the second time in less than a month that this particular conversation has come up with supposed tech people who should know better.)

I was blown away. Not so much that a marketing person asked that I change an article to be more “on message” for their client – that’s sadly par for the course – but that someone working for a hyperconvergence-based cloud-in-a-can company doesn’t know that nerds use “snapshotting” as a verb.

Juggling with style

My salvation lies in the part where there are marketing people and then there are marketing people. The polar opposite of Marketing McDerpy up above is the incomparable Jane Rimmer.

Let’s consider a recent conversation I had in the vEpxert Slack. I was discussing with some vExperts how I’d like to do some testing on a node that a vendor is sending me for review. I was thinking about reaching out to a few VDI vendors so that I could use their software to push the node to its limits and include their software (and the results) in my review.

One of the vendors I mentioned directly was Liquidware Labs, who happen to be one of Jane’s clients. A couple of hours later I have email from Jane saying she saw my comment on Slack, and could she help.

I don’t know why I was so shocked by this. Jane’s not some fresh out of school marketing droid eager to sell clouds like they were apples. She’s so devoted to her craft that she herself is a vExpert.

Because of course she is. She’s Jane Rimmer. If tech marketing had a super hero, she’d be it.

The bottom line

Having marketing and PR people who care enough to learn about your product and the market in which you operate makes all the difference. It makes life less frustrating for the writers you interact with. It helps to build a community around your brand. More importantly, it helps everyone understand what it is you do and why organizations should give you money to do it.

The tech industry needs more technologically competent people like Jane Rimmer. The Tech industry needs a lot less buzzword bingo playing derpologists in senior marketing and PR positions.

It’s up to tech vendors to choose whom they’ll employ. And it’s up to us, as buyers of that tech to choose which vendors we support.

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