drink the sweet feeling of the colour zero

On not dropping the PR and marketing ball

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As a tech journalist and as a commercial tech writer the bane of my professional existence is PR and marketing people who don’t know anything about the companies or products they are trying to promote. The very worst among offenders among them are simply applying “tickbox” marketing and PR; they go through whatever list they were given in school and figure selling tech is the same as selling apples.

Fortunately, not all PR and marketing people are like this.

I don’t have time to praise everyone in tech PR and marketing that are great at their job. There are a lot of you out there, and I love each and every one of you for it. There is, however one comparative anecdote I’d really like to share that should drive home the difference between someone who’s terrible at their job and someone who is truly amazing at it.

Dropping the ball

On the terrible at their job side we have an individual working for a hybrid-cloud-in-a-can company that doesn’t know what their own product does. The solution in question is an OpenStack-based hyperconverged appliance starting at four nodes that has some built-in options to interconnect with OpenStack-based service providers and/or a major public cloud provider.

This isn’t exactly rocket surgery anymore. At the end of 2017, there are a dozen cloud-in-a-can providers, many of which shift OpenStack based solutions. By now, anyone who knows anything about private cloud technology can tell you pretty much all you need to know about this product just by saying “OpenStack-based hyperconverged cloud-in-a-can”.

I published a blog on a tech news website that mentioned the vendor in question’s solution. It was a passing comment as an example of a vendor in the space who has done reasonably well and had a few big customer wins.

A marketing person for this company wrote me to ask that I make some changes to the article. They didn’t want me to mention that they were using hyperconvergence to lash the nodes together. “They’re not hyperconverged” sayeth the marketdroid (yes they are, BTW), they’re “multi-cloud” (that’s a huge stretch).

If that wasn’t enough, the marketing body had a list of things in the article they wanted clarified. From common acronyms to terms of the trade to idioms. There was even a discussion about how “snapshotting” isn’t a verb. (Terrifyingly, this is the second time in less than a month that this particular conversation has come up with supposed tech people who should know better.)

I was blown away. Not so much that a marketing person asked that I change an article to be more “on message” for their client – that’s sadly par for the course – but that someone working for a hyperconvergence-based cloud-in-a-can company doesn’t know that nerds use “snapshotting” as a verb.

Juggling with style

My salvation lies in the part where there are marketing people and then there are marketing people. The polar opposite of Marketing McDerpy up above is the incomparable Jane Rimmer.

Let’s consider a recent conversation I had in the vEpxert Slack. I was discussing with some vExperts how I’d like to do some testing on a node that a vendor is sending me for review. I was thinking about reaching out to a few VDI vendors so that I could use their software to push the node to its limits and include their software (and the results) in my review.

One of the vendors I mentioned directly was Liquidware Labs, who happen to be one of Jane’s clients. A couple of hours later I have email from Jane saying she saw my comment on Slack, and could she help.

I don’t know why I was so shocked by this. Jane’s not some fresh out of school marketing droid eager to sell clouds like they were apples. She’s so devoted to her craft that she herself is a vExpert.

Because of course she is. She’s Jane Rimmer. If tech marketing had a super hero, she’d be it.

The bottom line

Having marketing and PR people who care enough to learn about your product and the market in which you operate makes all the difference. It makes life less frustrating for the writers you interact with. It helps to build a community around your brand. More importantly, it helps everyone understand what it is you do and why organizations should give you money to do it.

The tech industry needs more technologically competent people like Jane Rimmer. The Tech industry needs a lot less buzzword bingo playing derpologists in senior marketing and PR positions.

It’s up to tech vendors to choose whom they’ll employ. And it’s up to us, as buyers of that tech to choose which vendors we support.

Podcasting for Cancer

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If you’ve been paying attention to my twitter – or that of many other vBloggers and vExperts – then you’ve seen me talking about Podcasting for Cancer.  I have been asked by more than a few people why I started this.  What’s the point?  What am I trying to achieve?

Many questions have filtered in amongst the overwhelming support for the idea.  As the project is taking on a life it’s own more and more people are becoming involved.  I thought it would be a good time to talk a little about the whys and wherefores so that all those people who are doing excellent work are given the kudos they are due.

Why I did this is simple: a friend of mine – Gabriel Chapman – has just learned that his mom’s cancer has moved into her lungs.  This is after recently losing his dad to the disease and two of his grandparents before that.  Before I had heard of this, everything that could be said had already been said by others.  No amount of platitudes or sympathy will make something like this better.

I felt wholly inadequate in the face of that frustration and sorrow.  My own worries and concerns seemed small and petty.  Gabe is a good guy; a friend…and he is hurting.  The urge to do something about that is powerful, as is the feeling of inadequacy as I flailed about trying to thing of something that might make even the smallest amount of difference.

I’ve never lost anyone to cancer; not while I was old enough to remember.  Nonetheless, I tried to put myself in his shoes.  I could imagine feeling trapped, impotent, isolated; the whole world turned against you, everyone living their lives while you feel like you’re underwater, struggling for air.  I thought about this and decided that the one thing that I could provide for my friend was the feeling that he wasn’t alone.

vPeeps are amazing

Pushing a few knobs on Indiegogo and filling out some forms isn’t exactly a huge burden.  Putting some time and effort into social networking and rallying the troops around this also isn’t a big deal  I have spent enough time amongst the vBloggers, vExperts and vVendors that make up the VMware community to know that if I only pushed that first domino, they would rally behind it and we would make that $5000 goal.

Gabriel Chapman is well liked.  Cancer is a terrible disease that has touched almost everyone’s life.  Put these two things together and I knew that if we (the community) set out to raise money in the Chapman familiy’s name then that money would get raised.

More importantly, I hoped that Gabe would be shown that even in this very dark time, he is not alone.  He has made an impact on an entire community and made quite literally dozens of friends, all of whom are there for him in whatever way we can possibly help.

The community did not disappoint.

A life of its own

What I didn’t expect was exactly how quick and enthusiastic the response would actually be.  Everyone seems willing to donate time to being on a podcast or a webex as part of the effort.  People are spreading the information through social media, contacting vendors and trying to keep momentum going.  $5000 looks to have been a very shortsighted goal.

The driving forces behind this explosion of community have been Jon Harris and Jonathan Frappier. They’ve taken my very simple idea and infused it with energy, ideas and passion that look set to grow Podcasting for Cancer far beyond anything I could have imagined.

There is talk of tying the event in with Movember and even running it as a regular yearly thing.  Brainstorming and strategy sessions about how to drum up vendor support and really catalyze the community followed.  Discussions were had to get other community organisations – like vBrownbag, vDB and VMUG – behind the project.

In two days these gentlemen have taken an idea I hadn’t really thought out completely and turned the knobs up to 11.  They are amazing.

I set out on this journey with nothing more in mind than making a friend feel less lonely and helpless.  The community response – exemplified in the efforts of “the Jons” – might just change the world.  If there is a bag of kudos to be heaped here, it is upon them.

Thank you, all of you…and let’s keep on podcasting for cancer.

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